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Monday, August 14, 2017

Backbiting (Gheebah) and its Expiation

Backbiting (Gheebah) and its Expiation

A. What is the ruling on accusing somebody of having a loose tongue? 
B. Do you have to tell them what they have said and to whom? 
This is a matter that has arisen and instead of the person being told what they are supposed to have said and to whom. They are being told that the ones telling them they have a loose tongue, that they have it on good authority that they do not have to say any more than "you have a loose tongue" 
C. How can a person be accused of something they might not have said without telling them? 
The person could be innocent and their reputation is now in pieces. 
I ask you to please provide all the relevant Islamic rulings on this matter to Inshallah stop all the slandering and backbiting that is happening to the person accused of having a loose tongue.

Praise be to Allah.

Firstly:  

The Muslim has to guard his tongue and avoid things that have been forbidden. Among these forbidden things which people often take lightly are gheebah (backbiting), buhtan (slander) and nameemah (malicious gossip). 

Gheebah or backbiting means speaking about a Muslim in his absence and saying things that he would not like to have spread around or mentioned. Buhtan or slander means saying things about a Muslim that are not true, or in other words telling lies about him. Nameemah or malicious gossip means telling one person what another said in order to cause trouble between them. 

There is a great deal of evidence to show that these actions are haram (impermissible). It will suffice for us to mention just a few of them in order to demonstrate that they are haram. 

Allah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“neither backbite one another. Would one of you like to eat the flesh of his dead brother? You would hate it (so hate backbiting). And fear Allah. Verily, Allah is the One Who forgives and accepts repentance, Most Merciful” [49:12] 

It was narrated from Abu Hurayrah (may Allah be pleased with him) that the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said: “Do you know what gheebah (backbiting) is?” They said, “Allah and His Messenger know best.” He said, “Saying something about your brother that he dislikes.” It was said, “What if what I say about my brother is true?” He said, “If what you say is true then you have backbitten about him, and if it is not true, then you have slandered him.” 

[Muslim]

It was narrated that Ibn ‘Abbas said: The Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) passed by two graves and said, “They are being punished, but they are not being punished for anything that was difficult to avoid. One of them used to walk about spreading malicious gossip (nameemah), and the other used not to take precautions to avoid getting urine on himself when he urinated.” Then he called for a green branch, which he split in two and planted a piece on each grave, and said, “May their torment be reduced so long as these do not dry out.” [al-Bukhaari, Muslim] 

For a person to say of another, “He cannot control his tongue (or he has a loose tongue)” is undoubtedly one of those things that a person would dislike to have said about him. If it is true, then it is gheebah (backbiting), and if it is not true then it is buhtan (slander). 

Everyone who does any kind of backbiting, slander or malicious gossip has to repent and pray for forgiveness, and that is between him and Allaah. If he knows that any of his words reached the person about whom he was speaking, then he should go to him and ask him to forgive him. But if he does not know, then he should not tell him; rather he should pray for forgiveness for him and make du’a(supplication) for him, and speak well of him in his absence just as he spoke against him. Similarly, if he knows that telling him will provoke more enmity, then it is sufficient to make du’a for him, speak well of him and pray for forgiveness for him. 

It was narrated that Abu Hurayrah (may Allah be pleased with him) said: The Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said: “Whoever has wronged his brother with regard to his honour or anything else, let him seek his forgiveness today, before there will be no dinar and no dirham, and if he has any good deeds to his credit they will be taken from him in a manner commensurate with the wrong he did, and if he has no good deeds, then some of his counterpart’s bad deeds will be taken and added to his burden.” [al-Bukhaari]. 

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah said: 

Whoever wrongs a person by slandering him, backbiting about him or insulting him, then repents, Allah will accept his repentance, but if the one who was wronged finds out about that, he has the right to settle the score. But if he slandered him or backbit about him and the person did not hear of that, then there are two views according to the scholars, both of which were narrated from Ahmad, the more correct of which is that he should not tell him that he spoke against him in his absence. It was said that he should rather speak well of him in his absence just as he spoke badly of him in his absence, as al-Hasan al-Basri said: the expiation for gheebah is to pray for forgiveness for the person about whom you backbit. Majmoo’ al-Fataawa.

And Allah knows best.

Source: https://islamqa.info/en/23328

Islam Q&A

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Why does Islam not tell us to eat less red meat?

I would like to ask in the quran all meat except for pork is halal but doctors say that red meat is full of cholesterol and that it can lead to heart attacks and blockages in the veins so my question is if this food is dangerous to eat then why is it not in the quran that you should try to limit the amount that you eat.

Praise be to Allaah.  

It should noted first of all that the Qur’aan’ is a book of guidance and law-giving, it is not a book of medicine or astronomy, so that some people want it to mention everything that has to do with medicine, astronomy, plants or animals. 

Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“(This is) a Book which We have revealed unto you (O Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم) in order that you might lead mankind out of darkness (of disbelief and polytheism) into light (of belief in the Oneness of Allaah and Islâmic Monotheism) by their Lord’s Leave to the path of the All‑Mighty, the Owner of all praise”

[Ibraaheem 14:1] 

“And this is a blessed Book (the Qur’aan) which We have sent down, so follow it and fear Allaah (i.e. do not disobey His Orders), that you may receive mercy”

[al-An’aam 6:155] 

With regard to food, the Qur’aan forbids some foods and mentions them in detail, and some others are mentioned in the Sunnah of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).  

The Qur’aan mentions some general principles that have to do with food, then all of that is explained in detail in the Sunnah of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). 

Some of the issues that are discussed in detail in the Qur’aan are the following. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Say (O Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم): ‘I find not in that which has been revealed to me anything forbidden to be eaten by one who wishes to eat it, unless it be Maytah (a dead animal) or blood poured forth (by slaughtering or the like), or the flesh of swine (pork); for that surely, is impure or impious (unlawful) meat (of an animal) which is slaughtered as a sacrifice for others than Allaah (or has been slaughtered for idols, or on which Allaah’s Name has not been mentioned while slaughtering). But whosoever is forced by necessity without wilful disobedience, nor transgressing due limits; (for him) certainly, your Lord is Oft‑Forgiving, Most Merciful’”

[al-An’aam 6:145]  

“Forbidden to you (for food) are: Al‑Maitah (the dead animals — cattle — beast not slaughtered), blood, the flesh of swine, and that on which Allaah’s Name has not been mentioned while slaughtering (that which has been slaughtered as a sacrifice for others than Allaah, or has been slaughtered for idols) and that which has been killed by strangling, or by a violent blow, or by a headlong fall, or by the goring of horns — and that which has been (partly) eaten by a wild animal — unless you are able to slaughter it (before its death) ‑ and that which is sacrificed (slaughtered) on An‑Nusub (stone‑altars). (Forbidden) also is to use arrows seeking luck or decision; (all) that is Fisqun (disobedience of Allaah and sin)”

[al-Maa’idah 5:3] 

With regard to some principles, Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“and eat and drink but waste not by extravagance, certainly He (Allaah) likes not Al‑Musrifoon (those who waste by extravagance)”

[al-A’raaf 7:31] 

This prohibition on extravagance in eating and drinking is general in meaning and does not apply to any particular type of food or drink. 

This general prohibition on extravagance is more far-reaching than simply forbidding extravagance in eating red meat or anything else, because this general meaning applies to many things. 

Ibn al-Qayyim (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in Zaad al-Ma’aad (4/213): 

Allaah guided His slaves to consume that which is enough to support the body of food and drink, and told them that it should be to the extent that will benefit the body in terms of quantity and quality. If it goes beyond that then it is extravagance, and both of them pose an obstacle to health and cause sickness; I mean not eating and drinking, or being extravagant in them. Preservation of health is included in these two words. End quote. 

Allaah says, describing the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) (interpretation of the meaning): 

“he allows them as lawful At‑Tayyibaat (i.e. all good and lawful as regards things, deeds, beliefs, persons and foods), and prohibits them as unlawful Al‑Khabaa’ith (i.e. all evil and unlawful as regards things, deeds, beliefs, persons and foods)”

[al-A’raaf 7:157] 

And He says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“They ask you (O Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم) what is lawful for them (as food ). Say: “Lawful unto you are At‑Tayyibaat [all kinds of Halaal (lawful‑good) foods which Allaah has made lawful (meat of slaughtered eatable animals, milk products, fats, vegetables and fruits)]”

[al-Maa’idah 5:4] 

So everything that is good is permissible, and everything that is bad is haraam. 

With regard to the Sunnah, the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) forbade the eating of every animal that has fangs and every bird that has talons, and he forbade eating the meat of domesticated donkeys, etc. 

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) also explained how the believer should be with regard to food and drink, as he said: “The human being does not fill any vessel worse than his stomach. It is sufficient for the son of Adam to eat a few mouthfuls, to keep him going. If he must do that (fill his stomach), then let him fill one third with food, one third with drink and one third with air.”

Narrated by al-Tirmidhi and classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Tirmidhi

And the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) forbade every harmful thing, whether that is food, drink or anything else. He said: “There should be neither harming nor reciprocating harm.” Narrated by Ibn Maajah (2340) and classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Irwa’ al-Ghaleel(896). 

The food may be halaal in principle, but because of extravagance in eating it that leads to harm, it may be haraam. This does not apply only to meat; everything that will cause harm to a person if eaten is haraam, even dates. 

The scholars also stated that it is haraam to eat anything that causes harm. 

See: al-Majmoo’, 9/39. 

If it is proven that a certain food is harmful then it is haraam to eat it, but it should be noted that harmful foods may vary from one person or country to another, so it is not permissible to say that it is haraam in general terms, rather it is haraam only for the one who will be harmed by it, if he eats the amount that will harm him.

Source:
Islam Q&A
https://islamqa.info/en/71317

Also please read this additional resources:
https://islam.stackexchange.com/questions/38727/why-isnt-it-cow-meat-prohibited-when-it-is-said-to-cause-sickness

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Shortening of prayer during travelling (Salaah)

If a person is always travelling, can he avail himself of the concessions of travel?

We are workers for a Tunisian shipping company. We travel from Tunisia to Italy, and we go back to Tunisia, then on the same day we travel to France. We have one day off every week, and we stay on this schedule for 3 or 4 months. 
Does the ruling on the traveller, allowing one to shorten prayers and put them together, apply to us? 
When we go back to Tunisia and are waiting for the ship to travel on the same day (the waiting period is about four hours), does the ruling on the traveller apply to us during that period? 
Please note that there are some workers who live near the port. 
On our day off, there are some who do not go to their homes, because they are far away. Does the ruling on the traveller apply in this case? 
If we do come under the ruling on travellers, can we shorten our prayers on the way to the ship?

Published Date: 2014-07-15

Praise be to Allah.

Firstly: 

With regard to the traveller who is constantly travelling, such as sailors on board ships, train drivers, taxi drivers and pilots, they may avail themselves of the concessions for travelling whilst they are actually travelling, but when they reach the place where they live, they must offer their prayers in full, because the description of traveller has ceased to apply to them. They must also – according to the view of the majority – offer their prayers in full when they halt in some city and intend to stay there for four days or more. 

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allah have mercy on him) said: 

He should break the fast (and shorten the prayer) – this refers to the one who usually travels, if he has a home that he returns to, such as a merchant who brings food and other items, and such as the muleteer who takes his mounts to bring merchandise (for a trader), and so on, and like the official courier who travels in the interests of the Muslims, and others like them. The same applies to the sailor who has a place on land where he lives. As for the one who has his wife with him on board the ship and has everything he needs with him and is always travelling, he should not shorten his prayers or break the fast.

End quote from Majmoo‘ al-Fataawa(25/213) 

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz (may Allah have mercy on him) was asked: What about the man who is always travelling, such as if he is a driver who goes between cities? Is it better for him to shorten the prayers or offer them in full? And, by the same token, the other concessions that are allowed when travelling? 

He (may Allah have mercy on him) replied:

With regard to the traveller who is always travelling, such as a taxi driver or camel driver, if he is travelling by camel, as in the past, he may shorten his prayers for the duration of the trip, and he may put his prayers together for the duration of the trip. But when he reaches his city he should not shorten his prayers or put them together, and when he reaches a city where he intends to stay for more than four days, he should not shorten his prayers or put them together. But so long as he is travelling, or comes under the rulings on travelling, or the nature of his work involves travelling, or he is always travelling, then he is may avail himself of the concessions of travels, based on the texts of the Qur’an and Sunnah, as both of them classify him as a traveller. If a person is always travelling, because he is a camel driver or a taxi driver, he may shorten his prayers whilst he is travelling, and for the duration of his stay in a city he is passing through, if his stay will be four days or less.

End quote from Fataawa Noor ‘ala ad-Darb

http://www.alifta.net/Fatawa/FatawaChapters.aspx?View=Page&PageID=3375&PageNo=1&BookID=5 

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allah have mercy on him) said:

Shortening the prayer is connected to travel; so long as a person is travelling, it is prescribed for him to shorten his prayers, whether he travels rarely or all the time, if he has a hometown to which he returns and knows that it is his hometown. Based on that, it is permissible for a truck driver to avail himself of the concessions of travel with regard to shortening the prayer, wiping over the khuffayn for three days and nights, breaking the fast in Ramadan, and other concessions of travel. 

End quote from Majmoo‘ Fataawa Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (15/264) 

Based on that, you may avail yourselves of the concessions of travel in two cases:

When you are travelling to the two countries mentioned in your question

and when you are staying in that place for less than four days, according to the view of the majority. 

For more information, please see the answers to questions no. 105844 and98574 

Secondly: 

With regard to shortening your prayer in the port, that depends: 

1.

If the person who is working for the company is resident in another city, other than the city where the port is, then he also comes under the ruling on travellers, and it makes no difference in his case whether the port is in his country or in another country; what matters is his place of residence. 

2.

If he is a resident in the same city, and the port is within the boundaries of the built-up area of the city, then when he reaches the port, he is no longer under the ruling on travel, so it is not permissible for him to avail himself of the concessions of travel. So he cannot shorten his prayers or put them together, or break the fast of Ramadan. 

If he is setting out on his journey, it is not permissible for him to avail himself of any of those concessions so long as he is still in the port. Rather he may begin to avail himself of those concessions when he has left the built-up area of the city in which he resides. 

3.

If he lives in the same city where the port is, but the port is outside the built-up area of the city, and is not attached to the residential areas, then in his case the rulings on travel do not cease to be in effect just because he reached the port; rather he may continue to avail himself of the concessions of travel until he reaches the edge of the built-up areas of the city. 

But if he is setting out on his journey, then he may begin to avail himself of the concessions of travel when he passes beyond the built-up area of his city, even if he is in the port or someplace before that. 

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allah have mercy on him) was asked: If a person is in al-Qaseem and goes out to the airport, can he shorten his prayers in the airport? 

He replied:

Yes he can shorten his prayers, because he has passed beyond the built-up area of his town. All the towns that are around the airport are separate from it. But if he is one of those who live in the area near the airport, then he cannot shorten his prayers in the airport, because he has not yet left the built-up areas of his town. 

End quote from ash-Sharh al-Mumti‘(4/364) 

And Allah knows best.

Islam Q&A
Source: https://islamqa.info/en/192168

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Ruling on shortening of prayer (Salaah)

They stay in their place of work for 28 days; can they shorten their prayers?

We are a group of men working far away from our homes and families, in a place where there are no people living, and no buildings or mosques. The time we spend at work is equal to the time we spend in our homes, i.e., we work for 28 days in return for 28 days off. This continues all year round, and we work for 12 hours each day.  
Is it permissible for us to shorten and join our prayers when we are at work?.

Published Date: 2004-03-18

Praise be to Allaah.    

It is only permissible for travellers to shorten their prayers. If a traveller intends to stay for more than four days he is no longer allowed the concession granted for travellers. 

Based on this, you are not allowed to shorten or join your prayers, rather you have to offer the prayers in full, each prayer at its proper time, because you know that you are going to stay in your place of work for 28 days. 

It says in Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah(8/95): 

The traveller who intends to stay in a place for more than four days cannot shorten his prayers. If he is going to stay for less than that, he may shorten his prayers. 

Shaykh Ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked: What is your opinion about shortening the prayers when travelling a distance that makes shortening the prayers allowable – is that defined by a certain distance? What do you think about one who intends to stay someone for more than four days during his journey – is he allowed the concession of shortening his prayers? 

He replied: 

The majority of scholars are of the view that it is defined by the distance of a day and a night’s travel by camel or on foot at a regular pace, which is approximately 80 kilometers, because this distance is customarily regarded as travelling, unlike shorter distances.

 The majority also narrated that whoever resolves to stay for more than four days has to offer the prayers in full, and fast if it is Ramadaan. If the period of stay is less than that, he may shorten and join his prayers, and break his fast, because the basic principle is that one who is settled (not travelling) has to offer the prayers in full, and shortening them is only allowed when he starts travelling. 

Fataawa Ibn Baaz, 12/270. 

The Standing Committee was asked about a man who was far from his family because of his work, as a distance at which shortening the prayers becomes permissible – is it permissible for him to shorten the prayers only whilst travelling between his family and his place of work, noting that the first time he had intended to stay there for a month, for example. They replied: 

He may shorten and join his prayers whilst on the road, so long as the distance between his workplace and his home is a distance at which shortening the prayers becomes permissible. If he intended to stay in his place of work for a month, then he is not allowed the concessions of travel in his workplace, rather he should offer every prayer at its proper time, in full.” 

Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah li’l-Buhooth al-‘Ilmiyyah wa’l-Ifta’, 8/94, 95 

The Standing Committee was also asked (8/109) about a person who traveled to another country for two years: could he shorten his prayers? 

They replied: The basic principle is that the traveller is the one who may shorten the four-rak’ah prayers, because Allaah says (Interpretation of the meaning): 

“And when you (Muslims) travel in the land, there is no sin on you if you shorten As‑Salaah (the prayer)”

[al-Nisa’ 4:101] 

And Ya’la ibn Umayyah said: I said to ‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab (may Allaah be pleased with him): “ ‘there is no sin on you if you shorten As‑Salaah (the prayer) if you fear that the disbelievers may put you in trial (attack you)’ [al-Nisa’ 4:101]; but now the people are safe.” He said: “I wondered the same thing, and I asked the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) about it. He said: ‘This is a favour (lit. charity) that Allaah has granted you, so accept His favour.’” Narrated by Muslim.  

The one who is regarded as coming under the ruling on travellers is one who stays for four days and nights or less, because it was proven in the hadeeth of Jaabir and Ibn ‘Abbaas (may Allaah be pleased with them both) that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) came to Makkah in the morning of the fourth of Dhu’l-Hijjah for the Farewell Pilgrimage, and he stayed for the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh, and he prayed Fajr in al-Abtah on the morning of the eighth. He shortened his prayers during these days and he formed the intention to stay there as is well known. So everyone who is travelling and intends to spend the same length of time as the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did or less may shorten the prayers. Whoever intends to stay longer than that should offer the prayers in full, because he does not come under the ruling on travellers.

Source: https://islamqa.info/en/31926

Islam Q&A